Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Ten Steps for creating a Model Beauty Shot and podcast recap



On my podcast radio show Model Talk today I talked about Beauty Modeling tips, and
working as a beauty model comes down to two things:

1. How well you can capture your assets on camera

2. How well you can market them

Your compcard should always include at least one beauty shot, which is an image of your face showcasing your assets, like a beauty ad or skincare ad, with a fresh, natural and pretty appeal.

Beauty is an area that a shorter girl can pursue because beauty has nothing to do with height or weight.

Beauty modeling actually does have something to do with the glow you give off in your face and your height is not an issue. So don't think it is.

To market yourself as a beauty model you first need the right photos. A few different variations are best to create. Here are ten steps to creating a beauty shot.

1. Look at examples of where you see beauty shots in magazines and print ad campaigns, (you could also study commercials for skincare, beauty products and hair care), notice the ads, notice the angle of the model's face.

2. Go to the mirror and actually practice posing your face, notice what happens to it when the light hits different parts of it while you move it slowly side to side. Study your face.

3. What are your facial assets? Before you get infront of the camera, be a prepared model and smart model, first try to imagine the photo you want to capture.

4. Seek out professional photographer's, only those who know the craft of photography, and who know what a beauty shot is. Approach them by calling their photo studio or by email setting up a meeting in a public place. When approaching the photogapher send a headshot of yourself and also an example by jpeg of the type of beauty shot you are going for.

4. At the meeting, before you set up a photo-shoot, bring examples of the type of shot your are going for. See if the photographer gets the beauty shot you are going for, and if so work out a time to shoot.

5. Ask about makeup for the shoot, or suggest a makeup artist you know. It is worth paying some bucks for a good makeup artist, or if you are having a hard time, get your foundation down right by visting a cosmetic counter at a department store or Sephora a few days before the shoot and buy the foundation and apply it at the shoot, then add some mascara, curl your lashes, and some natural gloss or chapstick or lipstick, nothing too bold for lips and eyes, natural is the best beauty shot. Again you will see this when you look at ads and editorials in magazines in step 1. Bring these examples with you to the makeup counter or share them with the makeup arist ahead of time.

6. remember NOT to over-do the makeup, it should be natural, it should be the true you, not you coated in makeup. Think airy, flowers, garden, ocean, fresh, not clogging pores with cakey makeup yuck!


7. Bring hair clips and hair ties to the shoot, you may want shots with your hair down or out of your face and totally pulled back. Bring hair spray as well and a brush or comb.

8. Bring clothing! a selection of sweaters, dresses, and be aware of the front of the garment, and notice what part of the garment will be captured during the close up. You could have a pretty dress but if the front of it, when cropped and zoomed in on, looks bad it could ruin the shot.

A beauty shot could have bare shoulders but doesn't have to! So bring clothing. If you want to do something more about body, you could also bring a scarf to wrap around your bare shoulders. Stick to the style of the body and skincare ads you see in women's magazines.

9. A full body shot that is shot at high resolution could be cropped and turned into a beauty shot. Sometimes it is hard for a new model to get a beauty shot she likes if she is anxious and not experienced, so while at the shoot also take some full body shots, and later you could crop the full body into a headshot and use this as a beauty shot as well.

10. I love natural light, out doors light, and keep in midn that lighting is so important when you do a beauty shot, make sure your photographer has skills with lighting. You want the light to capture the best of you. It is not going to look as pretty if you have to photoshop the photo all day to get it looking nice. Focus on getting professionalism. Slow down and let the shots you need become a process not a race. You want the shots to be lasting, professional, beautiful and sell you well.

Creating Beauty Model Photos -some examples here

Working from example can be best so I wanted to share some of my beauty shots. Depending on the atmosphere of the shot, the lighting, the angle, you can create many different types of beauty shots. Some beauty shots have hair in the face even, with a beachy wind blown look, some are airy and light, some straight on, some at an angle or profile, but always make sure your skin and eyes are focus points.



shot by Robert Caldarone


Shot by Michael McCabe


shot by Michael McCabe


Shot by Robert Caldarone





shot by Robert Milazzo


shot by Robert Caldarone

A beauty shot can be super close up, or can be arranged in many styles, shoulder up, waist up, straight on to the camera, side profile, at an angle. The main idea is to capture your assets, highlight your skin, eyes, and facial features. Your hair is also something to consider, if have nice, healthy hair you should consider including your hair in the shot as well. However make sure you produce at least a few shots with hair totally OUT of the face.

Get inspired before you shoot:
Look at skincare ads, hair ads, cosmetic ads, perfume ads, and magazine covers as well. Notice the models facial expressions. A calm, natural, at ease facial expression is best.

Monday, December 28, 2009

A week of beauty on my blog and beauty model marketing tips

I am going to do a week of beauty tips on my blog based on marketing yourself as a beauty model, from photos to beauty upkeep. Also I will share some beauty tips for the "whole body" based on my own on the job lived through experiences.

Also on my podcast Model Talk Radio on Weds I will have a segment based on Beauty Model Advice for your compcard, photo shoots and marketing yourself as a beauty model this week. On the show I will be sharing insight on where beauty models are used and how you can get in the door with a modeling agency with beauty modeling. Using what you do have to get ahead. You don't need to dwell on your lack of height if you focus on your assets which could be your eyes, lips, skin, profile, and the natural glow in your face. :)

Also I will be sharing some of the videos I have made on beauty for AOL's Stylelist.com as well and others I have created on beauty tips as well. (view some below)

A WEEK OF BEAUTY STARTS NOW!

Beauty Model tip # 1. SKIN, FOUNDATION, POWDER.



To work as a beauty model you need to know your face. Know what you will be marketing.

What are your facial assets. Do you have nice eyes, nice skin, a nice profile, nice lips, your hair (hair modeling) also notice your ears and neck for jewelry modeling which can also be considered the beauty area.

However, before you get a beauty modeling job you should know how to do your makeup, enhance your features and keep your skin clear...So to prepare a beauty model compcard, your skin, foundation and powder are # 1 to get right, before you get in front of the lens.

Above all, your skin should be your main focus when it comes to working as a beauty model. Taking care of it is major, and keeping it blemish free. Yes, even in this Photoshop age you do not want to use Photoshop as a crutch to your pimple. If you do not moisturize, tone or cleanse your skin daily you SHOULD and make it part of your daily routine.

Moisturizer is important. If you are on a budget don't worry, you don't have to go broke finding one. I have used: Aveeno, Origins, St. Ives, LUSH, Clinique dramatically difference moisturing gel, Vichy, --all which won't kill your budget and they last a long time.

In the shower for clean and cleansing: During different ties I have used Neutrogena Deep Clean, St. Ives Apricot Cleanser, LUSH rub rub rub (on my face actually)often in the shower. I like a rougher facial salt sometimes on my face and and recently started using a tiny dab of Sugar Body Scrub by C.O. Bigelow on my face and body(nice!) Again don't use too many pro, products on your face all at once. Pick a moisturizer, pick a cleanser, toner, and zit zapper! :)

((Here is an interview on my radio show that I did with the marketing director at Origins, and you might enjoy this:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/isobellajade/2008/09/10/skincare-with-jenny-belknap-the-vice-president-of-global-marketing-at-origins

Ok, back to the face, if I feel a zip coming on I try to zap it very fast, right at the start with Clean & Clear Invisible blemish treatment for at least 20 minutes if I am home or I will put it on that night, over night, and then use a cleanser when I take it off.

Putting on your Foundation or Powder, First Steps:


When creating your compcard for beauty modeling, if there is not a makeup artist you will have to do it yourself, and actually it can be very basic. Your skin should look soft and natural.

To start: It is actually best to do your makeup NOT in the bathroom. The lighting can be bad, especially when you consider what the camera lens will see. I would buy a handheld large mirror and go to a window or go outside to do your makeup. Try it, you will notice a difference, you will quickly notice how the light is difference and you can get your foundation exsact.



I like to do under my eyes and then in a circle motion put on my foundation on my cheeks, chin, forehead, and then go down my nose. I try to keep the foundation light, let it dry, and then I will add a light powder. I like i.d bareMinerals. I wear Media Beige. Also get a foundation or powder that is SPF 15 if possible.
Here is a video where I share some "putting foundation lightly" tips:

Later, when it comes to attending beauty castings and modeling jobs,- you are usually asked to come without makeup or very little on. Especially, it is best NOT to cake on the makeup for your castings, even for beauty, and I would say some mascara and "light" everything else is best. Light eyeshadow, light blush, go light not heavy or bold, for the lipstick. Get used to NOT wearing a lot of makeup and instead enhancing and highlighting your assets without heavy makeup.

Also foundation and powder tip: If you are really struggling to get the right color of foundation then go to a Sephora, or a cosmetic counter at a department store, get your color tone right. It is worth paying the bucks to get a brand that works for you, but many drugstore brands are very good as well, Revlon, Almay, even Wet n Wild. Spend time to get the right foundation for your skin color. (I test foundation on my lower chin or neck, and make sure the color matches the color of your neck, it looks bad if your neck is one color and your face is another. Not good.)

To get good beauty shots you have to take care of your assets, your skin.

Coming up next are examples of beauty shots to get you inspired. So I would start noticing beauty editorials in magazines, and also ad campaigns involving skincare, haircare, cosmetics and perfume. And I will share my favorite ingredients in beauty items.

Friday, December 25, 2009

Merry Christmas Day to my Petite Modeling Tips readers! :)

Did Santa come? I hope so. I hope you have a wonderful Christmas Day & let this be a day to appreciate the things we should.

Christmas time always makes me think of the things that happened during the year and all I've done, and the things I still want to do and I start to get very anxious for the New Year.

I don't know about you but I am a bit nervous to write 2010, (I think it will be a good year, I've got this feeling) it just seems so weird to write, and time has flown by. 2002, doesn't feel that long ago but it was! 2005, 2006, the years just go by.

Strive, grow, prospere,

Isobella

Thursday, December 17, 2009

A reason to Watch 20/20 on Friday: Secret Designs

I want to vomit just thinking about how scamful the modeling business as become since the Internet-age. Or more like, how full of scams "the pursuit of being a model" has become. I made many mistakes as a model, but I thankfully overcame them and my self esteem and confidence and belief in my self did not alter.

I wrote about my early modeling pursuits in my memoir Almost 5'4" honestly and open because I think being honest can inspire girls who are pursuing modeling to skip the scams. I also touch upon modeling scams, and Internet scams and amateur modeling mistakes in my graphic novel Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior.

I can honestly say I am lucky to have survived some of the bad experiences I had during my early modeling pursuits.

Some things to keep in mind when pursuing as a model.

1. Don't be desperate to succeed, so much that you lose your dignity.
2. Don't think ONE person can make you famous or successful.
3. Don't think it happens over night.
4. Beware of online casting calls, scams lerk.

This Friday, December 18th, on 20/20 at 9pm there is a special hour featuring the Rise and Fall of Anand Jon. ((I had a friend who did go to a casting at his studio in NYC, and she was called fat and dissed by him even though she has a fab body.))

Here is the link for more info on the segment:
http://abcnews.go.com/2020/anand-jon-fashion-designer-convicted-serial-sexual-assault/story?id=9344417

I suggest watching this feature on ABC 20/20, to hear the sad story of girls falling for the wrong fashion opportunity.

Many of Anand's castings were on the Internet, emails written, also the encounters stemmed from Internet social site communication, Myspace, etc.

The Internet has caused a lot of hype and interest among curious girls who want to be models,-they go to Google and search, upload photos and flaunt, but the truth is They Are Setting Themselves Up For Scams. I believe the Internet is NOT a way that aspiring models can get ahead. It is best to NOT promote yourself on a model on it on random social sites.

It might seem easy, convenient, and normal to find castings, and promote yourself as a model on the web but it is amateur and typically only brings amateur opportunities. I think the Internet is the totally opposite and wrong way to promote your self as a model. Scams and people like Anand are found on the Internet, and you should focus on professionalism and if you want to really find professional opportunities as a model they do not happen on the Internet, it is better to get a comp card made, mail it aggressively to print modeling and talent agencies and aim higher.

Modeling is not showing off, being pretty, or the right size, a model is someone who is "modeling for something" and in a professional environment consistently, and to do it you should not lose your dignity or think you have to sleep with someone to get ahead or put your self in a situation where your worth is tested.

Watch 20/20 at 9pm this Friday, December 18th.

Don't be obsessed with fame and being in the spot light that you lose your dignity. If you are looking for a short-cut, you just might find a scam or even worse.

Also keep in mind
1. you don't need to have sex with someone, make out, or date someone to get ahead.
2. it is possible to get a modeling agency and gete professional modeling jobs but you DO have to work hard for it.
3. Make sure you are comfortable at a casting, on the job, etc, if you are not leave the atmosphere, there will be other opportunities out there.

A reason to Watch 20/20 on Friday: Secret Designs

I want to vomit just thinking about how scamful the modeling business as become since the Internet-age. Or more like, how full of scams "the pursuit of being a model" has become. I made many mistakes as a model, but I thankfully overcame them and my self esteem and confidence and belief in my self did not alter.

I wrote about my early modeling pursuits in my memoir Almost 5'4" honestly and open because I think being honest can inspire girls who are pursuing modeling to skip the scams. I also touch upon modeling scams, and Internet scams and amateur modeling mistakes in my graphic novel Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior.

I can honestly say I am lucky to have survived some of the bad experiences I had during my early modeling pursuits.

Some things to keep in mind when pursuing as a model.

1. Don't be desperate to succeed, so much that you lose your dignity.
2. Don't think ONE person can make you famous or successful.
3. Don't think it happens over night.
4. Beware of online casting calls, scams lerk.

This Friday, December 18th, on 20/20 at 9pm there is a special hour featuring the Rise and Fall of Anand Jon. ((I had a friend who did go to a casting at his studio in NYC, and she was called fat and dissed by him even though she has a fab body.))

Here is the link for more info on the segment:
http://abcnews.go.com/2020/anand-jon-fashion-designer-convicted-serial-sexual-assault/story?id=9344417

I suggest watching this feature on ABC 20/20, to hear the sad story of girls falling for the wrong fashion opportunity.

Many of Anand's castings were on the Internet, emails written, also the encounters stemmed from Internet social site communication, Myspace, etc.

The Internet has caused a lot of hype and interest among curious girls who want to be models,-they go to Google and search, upload photos and flaunt, but the truth is They Are Setting Themselves Up For Scams. I believe the Internet is NOT a way that aspiring models can get ahead. It is best to NOT promote yourself on a model on it on random social sites.

It might seem easy, convenient, and normal to find castings, and promote yourself as a model on the web but it is amateur and typically only brings amateur opportunities. I think the Internet is the totally opposite and wrong way to promote your self as a model. Scams and people like Anand are found on the Internet, and you should focus on professionalism and if you want to really find professional opportunities as a model they do not happen on the Internet, it is better to get a comp card made, mail it aggressively to print modeling and talent agencies and aim higher.

Modeling is not showing off, being pretty, or the right size, a model is someone who is "modeling for something" and in a professional environment consistently, and to do it you should not lose your dignity or think you have to sleep with someone to get ahead or put your self in a situation where your worth is tested.

Watch 20/20 at 9pm this Friday, December 18th.

Don't be obsessed with fame and being in the spot light that you lose your dignity. If you are looking for a short-cut, you just might find a scam or even worse.

Also keep in mind
1. you don't need to have sex with someone, make out, or date someone to get ahead.
2. it is possible to get a modeling agency and gete professional modeling jobs but you DO have to work hard for it.
3. Make sure you are comfortable at a casting, on the job, etc, if you are not leave the atmosphere, there will be other opportunities out there.

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

On my to do list, see Jeff Bridges in Crazy Heart, movies that show striving and doing the best you can inspire me. Stories inspire me. Crazy Heart is about the hard life of a broken down country singer.


Along with seeing Invictus, an Eastwood's film about Mandela with Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon, I am sure it will rise all emotions.


What inspires you, keeps you going, gets the mind heading in the direction towards your goals? What do you do to get inspired?

Sunday, December 13, 2009

putting that modeling compcard to use and getting ahead

Here are some tips no matter if your live in a big city or smaller town on how to get active with some modeling and put your compcard to use!

If you live in a small city, mail print modeling agencies or talent agencies your compcard or headshot by postal mail, already being prepared with marketing material can get you ahead.

Also it is better to find work locally in your town and it is possible. First get some experience in your town, and pitching agencies in your town is a smart thing to do. Do not pitch agencies in cities you DO NOT LIVE. Agencies typically ONLY work with modeling who are based in the city they are based in. So if you live in Flordia, don't pitch an agency in NYC unless you have plans to move their already set, it makes agencies upset when they call you for a casting you can not make it. Modeling is a pursuit based on being available and if you are not available the agency just won't call you anymore. Don't expect to get room, and food or anything from an agency or think you will be discovered, (that is over) it is all about getting some experience and growing from it and pitching more, and getting more, it takes time it is a process.

So here is the scoop on some smaller city modeling pursuit goals:

If you are very new to the word model then get ready to get active and become a good researcher, to find your own oppportunities. I would start with researching local colleges research their photo department or a fashion schools who might need a model, try to reach local ad agencies creative department who might need a model for small jobs locally, mail your photo and resume and modeling interests and assets to marketing companies. And most important if your live in a smaller city don't think there are NOT opportunities there. Modeling is everywhere these days so you've got to get on it and be ready to take advantage of what might be in your town. Also many large brands are base in smaller cities where rent is cheaper so research to find out what brands, companies are based right in your city. Approach aspiring brands with your compcard, their might be a craft fair, tradeshow, a street full of boutiques, stop in, stop by, pitch yourself, and drop off your compcard. Be sure to write your phone number or email on the card but stray from exposing any amatuer modeling website profile links, (i would skip those all together) and only show professionalism no matter the size of your town.

If you live in bigger city such as LA, NYC, Miami, or Chicago, I would mail by postal mail 50 compcards, by doing so you are bound to hear back from at least one agency. (Again if you can not get to the casting in these cities within 30 minutes or so, do not apply, modeling castings are often last minute and getting to them it important, being available is key to model).

The more your market you the better, of course you need quality compcard and photos and a portfolio for castings but the more you try the more you get. These days there are many smaller size agencies that have been around for many, many, many years, and who are professional to work with but just smaller in size. In a competitive city you must work really hard and be prepared for it. The magazines, top brands, and many agencies are found in bigger cities but a lot more girls these days want to be models and are working as models. Let it be inspiration but be prepared to work hard. You could and shoul submit to agencies of all sizes, the top commercial print modeling agencies, but also the ones that are smaller in size. Getting some experience by working with a smaller boutique size agency is not a bad idea, it is a GREAT idea, get some real professional modeling experience modeling for products or in a magazine and use that experience to beef up your compcard and pitch other agencies you might want to work with. IT really is a marketing game for a shorter print model. You should be active as well pitching your self to aspiring brands and designers: Currently in Union Square and also Bryant Park there is a Holiday tradeshow craft fair and MANY designers are there, if you do not have any experience working with a product, go on, pitch yourself and compcard to some of these designers maybe? Get some experience it leads to more opportunities. And actually getting the experience often means getting off your ass and getting out there, and not relying on the internet to make you a model. That route is typically the road to amatuer land and doesn't lead to real modeling jobs.Showing an agency you can model does involve hands on work of yourself. So get out there! Aim to work with professionals!

Here is an episode on my radio show Model Talk on why you need a compcard and how working non-exclusive with an agency is how it usually is for print modeling, despite reality tv and what you might hear about getting an exclusive contract, it is not the end-all, and many,many,many print models work non-exclusively with print modeling agencies. In fact for print it is very normal.

Good luck! Isobella

Saturday, December 12, 2009

Almost 5'4" my modeling memoir in UK Feb 2010




My memoir Almost 5'4" is coming out in UK in Feb 2010 through The Friday Project an imprint of HarperCollins. Saw the book this weekend, if you live in the UK I hope you can add it to your reading to-do check list. Check out their edition cover above.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

4 things that count as a model


Modeling is a build, it is a process. It is not an overnight success. The more your give the more you get, and also here are some things that count:

1. What are your assets? Do you know what is marketable about you? Could you picture yourself in an ad or editorial in a magazine? What type of product could you model realistically? What type of magazine editorial realistically? What would an agency would think of your photos you send them, and again what types of jobs come to mind that you could do when you look in the mirror and show your personality? If you do not know, then you should think about this stuff before you pursue modeling.

2. Being available, it can mean getting a modeling job or not. Agencies want to know you are available for castings and bookings. Agencies will give you castnigs a week before, a few days before or on the day of.

3. Being prepared. Having your compcard, portfolio, yes, even in this digital age counts. At a casting you MUST leave a compcard and if you don't have these tools you might as well not even show up to the casting. Saying "go to my website" doesn't play out with professional modeling jobs. Also to get a modeling agency interested in working with you, you should mail your compcard through the postal mail. Then if the agency is interested they will ask you to meet them, or send them more compcards, which they will market to their clients, the agency might also ask you to email jpegs of more photos. HOWEVER, it is suggested to mail by postal mail your compcard or photos for the very first submission. Don't be a lazy model and think electronic submissions are best, they are not. We might live in a digital-age, internet-age but mailing your compcard in postal mail is best still for professional agencies.

4. Keep the spirit. Just because an agency wants to work with you doesn't mean all is perfect and done. No way! Most shorter girls will NOT get an exclusive contract and many print modeling agencies freelance or work non-exclusive with their models... working non-exclusive with an agency is a good start for aspiring non-fashion models, but it doesn't not mean the phone will ring every 5 minutes- you must keep working to improve your photos, and portfolio, and strive to gain more opportunities to build your portfolio. Having 'someone to work with' doesn't mean all is done and set. It isn't just about "Who you are with" but also about "what you have done" --- It isn't just about 'the contract' it is about "the right thing for you" and if you ARE getting work as a model with that agency. Focus on getting professional experience as a model. The more experience modeling for 'something' you have the better, and the more you can get. Keeping your positive spirit, energy and drive is a major part of getting opportunities.

MODELING is ALOT OF work, it is not easy, there is no short-cut, and many girls give up. Be realistic and ambitious and get more of what you want.

****ALSO BE VERY CAUTIOUS WHEN IT
COMES TO ONLINE CASTINGS******
***********AIM HIGHER ***********

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Exclusive and Non-Exclusive modeling agreement Podcast segment: which is best for your modeling pursuits?



Isobella answers questions from Facebook friends on what non-exclusive and exclusive modeling means and the future of working with modeling agencies. She shares how to know what type of agency agreement is best for you.

She will give tips on how to make a modeling compcard and why a non-fashion model needs one. Isobella is the author of Almost 5'4"- her modeling memoir, and her graphic novel "Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior, both can be found on BN.com or in stores, or on Amazon. For more on Isobella visit her website: www.isobelladreams.com.

Tune in here at 1PM EST live or listen to the archive anytime, along with other segments:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/isobellajade/2009/12/09/modeling-agency-exclusive-and-non-exclusive-101

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Work = rewards for the hustling model

The image in the media of what it takes to model and what IS a model is often wrong.

Being discovered is over. It can be hard to tell the difference to new aspiring model eyes between the scams and the professional, the internet age or having a website doesn't make it any easier. Working as a model, modeling for brands, product, with an agency takes work.

An open call is not something a shorter girl attends, and for print it is all about the postal mail submissions, but when it comes to WHAT to submit, WHERE to submit, and the work that goes into getting your marketing material together (compcard, or a headshot) it could be months before you even mail a modeling agency, then another few months before you hear back, and then you could end up feeling rejected, not good enough, and like you wasted your time.

But hang in there!

Modeling, no matter what you hear elsewhere is WORK, a lot of it. Especially for a girl who is not fashion height and especially in this present day. A very small amount of girls could call themselves models ten years ago, but today modeling is more than fashion, and the commercial print modeling world offers opportunities for all sizes, but it is WORK.

To get the opportunity I believe it takes ALOT of self work, managing your own photography, knowing what you need photographed, making a marketable compcard, mailing it to the right agencies, and it take a lot of time, effort, and study of ones self.

Ten years ago you might not have had to be a marketer, but today a model must be one.

Sunday, December 6, 2009

Signed copies of Model Life



There are 5 signed copies of my graphic novel "Model Life" at Barnes & Noble in Union Square (NYC), graphic novel section, you will love Jazmin Ruotolo's illustrations inside! P.s: Union Square shows up in the book as well! Also signed 2 in-store copies of Model Life at the Tribeca store this weekend, if you like signed books. :)

Thursday, December 3, 2009

no one can cut you down to size

When you believe in yourself, no one can cut you down to size, no matter your height.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

not settling for the so-called model life

Today on Bella Petite Radio I spoke about how the goal of aspiring models should be to get infront of the right agents, the right brands, and especially the right professional photographer.

I have had my own share of struggles and write this blog to advocate from what I have first-hand learned and experienced, and my memoir Almost 5'4" and graphic novel Model Life also are a form of sharing insight on overcoming the odds.



Having a profile page on a social site, even on a so-called Model Site, is not professional and will not help you appear professional. It is just a show-off tool, not something respected agents and professionals use.

I do not use my website to market myself as a model. I use it because I am an author and for my brand, for inspiring my readers and those who want to model.

Most of my readers are new to modeling and the best thing I can advise is NOT to use the Internet to promote yourself as a model. To be professional, to get a compcard, headshot, to mail to an agency and to strive for more, to aim higher than the "show off" factor. To really model, to really call yourself one you have to "model" something. A product. A brand, for something.

Unless the editorial in the magazine is about YOU, you should be focusing on modeling "products" and really modeling if you want to.

A website alone will not help your modeling pursuits, most agents still use compcards, or their own website to feature their models, and unless the photos are only professionalthe do-it-yourself method and only using your website, can lead you stuck.... If you really want to model, think about how you can use what you do have to modeling something, and create a compcard that is marketable towards brands and agents, which then leads to modeling jobs.

I wrote about the modeling opportunities I have found through the Internet, and a few were helpful, but mainly looking for work through the Internet castings can be a waste, for me, the REAL quality modeling jobs did not come from the Internet at all.
They come from my agent, or by myself approaching brands and working with photographers who are professional and work with clients and brands and magazines.

They came when I left the Internet behind and focused on marketing my assets to agents and brands. I've been in ad campaigns and product ads by marketing myself with a compcard, and headshot, to the right agents, or approaching the brands when I did have experience and over time built my own portfolio. It is not an over night thing, it comes from pure work, pure effort, pure trying. Knowing what is marketable about yourself and capturing that in photography you use to market yourself. If you are trying to model without a compcard you will not be going far, you need these tools, it is a MUST to work with agents and book quality work.

Isobella

Saturday, November 28, 2009

A video chat with mediamoiselle.com on modeling, striving and books

Enjoy this fab interview with Jennifer of Mediamoiselle.com. I talk about the journey of striving as a model and how being indie and creating your own is possible, along with sharing insight into my memoir Almost 5'4" and my graphic novel Model Life, which I also hope you enjoy!



Or your can find the interivew on mediamoiselle.com or Youtube.

Isobella on Bella Petite radio December 1st!


On December 1st I will be on Ann Lauren's BellaPetite hour radio show. BellaPetite.com is a magazine and home for the real petite, (5'5" and under).

Bella Petite's motto is “never underestimate yourself."

I'll be talking on the show about just this, and how aspiring models can use what they DO have to get ahead, no matter their height and how modeling is more than height and inches if you know how to market what you've got.

Tune in Tuesday here: http://bellapetite.com/radio/

Using an Alias to Model

A girl recently ask me "I want to use an alias for my last name on comp cards instead of using my real last name because I dont want to automatically be set to a hispanic catagory, since I can portray other ethnicities. I guess my question in this case is can I use an alias?"

My reply

An alias is perfectly fine. You could even put on your compcard just Rose if you wanted. However when it comes to payment and taxes, it is best no matter what Alias you use to let those who are paying you, giving you a check, to know your legal name and information.

Also another option is having a Doing Business As business account and if you plan to model professionally for a long time, then it would be wise to set this up if your Alias is different than your legal name.

You could go to the Courts and set up a business, a corporation, or company under the name you want to use. For example Sarah Smith Co.

You could take this business certificate and take it to your bank and open up attached to your checking account another account called a Doing Business As account or DBA.

This means if someone was to write a check out to Sarah Smith even if her legal name was different, she could deposit the check in her Doing Business As Account. You would still need to take care of your taxes and the work you do as a model would be considered a Doing Business As depoist.

Or simply tell the agent, or person who hires you your real name and have them write out the check to that name. But tell them you prefer to be known to clients and on the job as the name you'd wish, if different. And put the name you want the agency to refer to with clients on your compcard.

I hope this helps.
Isobella

Monday, November 23, 2009

Model Life feature in the NYDailyNews!


Yay, I wanted to share a feature in the New York Daily News on my graphic novel "Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Sized Fashion Warrior," and my Illustrator Jazmin Ruotolo, and my self. I hope you enjoy it and check out Model Life :)

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music/2009/11/22/2009-11-22_petite_model_and_internet_personality_isobella_jade_tells_her_story_in_a_graphic.html

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

The Models of the Model Life book party photo-shoot

Most book parties allow the author to mingle with their readers, for the Model Life book party it was an interactive experience where guests were able to watch live petite models model shoes from Bakers. It was an amazing time, and here are some of my favorite shots of the girls from the photo-shoot shot by Robert Milazzo at MercBar in SoHo.

Guest also enjoyed sampling some of my favorite "petite" fashion and cosmetic brands. We had the participation of Sweet Petite's, Lula Lu Lingerie, LUSH, Michael Antonio shoes as well, as Styli-Style cosmetics!

Sonya.


Leila.


Tifanny.


Cheli.


Ashley.

Saturday, November 14, 2009

An Interview from the Model Life book party (video)

Enjoy this Fabulous interview after the Model Life book party with Colleen Brennan asking me about the root of Model Life!

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Petite Models and Model Life party tonight! whoo hoo


Whoo hoo, tonight is the night you can stop by my Model Life book party, where modeling and the graphic novel world come together, shorter models and high shoes, red balloons and red drinks, art and fashion, and my passions all come together. I hope to see you at MercBar, 151 Mercer street the festivities start at 7pm! :)

Here is the scoop and more details on the launch party, where 5 petite models will be rockin out shoe modeling!

Isobella

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

The Models of the Model Life book party on podcast tonight




The Model Life book party pre-party. At 9pm Est tonight, Isobella speaks to the petite models (Tiffany,Cheli, Sonya, an Ashley) who will be shoe modeling during the live photo-shoot at her interactive book party tomorrow Nov 12 for Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior. They discuss modeling,being petite and how height isn't everything in modeling. Shoe model Leila can't join us this evening but she will be rockin' the shoes as well at the party~ :)

Tune in here at 9pm EST:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/isobellajade/2009/11/12/The-Models-of-the-Model-Life-book-party-for-petite

Monday, November 9, 2009

Aspiring petite models in NYC meet Isobella Jade


If you live in NYC and you are an aspiring model, bring your compcard or portfolio to the book launch party for Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior on November 12th, 2009. Meet petite model, author, radio host Isobella Jade, and share your compcard with her and get some tips on being a height challenged model from a girl who's lived it.

Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior with Isobella Jade book signing.

When: November 12th 2009
Time: 7-9pm
Where: MercBar 151 Mercer Street New York, NY 10012
21 +, free

Friday, November 6, 2009

MODEL LIFE BOOK SIGNING SCOOP AND CHEERS!


Enjoy a complimentary welcome champagne toast @ my book party for Model Life, my graphic novel, in soho on November 12th. With a live shoe modeling photo-shoot going on during the signing, featuring 5 petite models, it will be a memorable time and there are many door prizes (shoes, lingerie, beauty product samples)for guests to enjoy as well. I look forward to seeing you!

Isobella

BOOK SIGNING SCOOP:
Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior with Isobella Jade
When: November 12th 2009
Time: 7-9pm
Where: MercBar 151 Mercer Street New York, NY 10012

More details on the party are here on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/friends/?id=100000213522258#/event.php?eid=154254507699&ref=mf

Thursday, November 5, 2009

Andy Pettitte is my favorite Yankee player


My favorite Yankee player is Andy Pettitte, because not only is he handsome and talented but he has the word Petite stretched out in his name!

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Model Life Book preview video here

Author Model Isobella Jade shares her graphic novel "Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior" available now. And some of her favorite pages of the book!

What Tyra should have done but didn't (ANTM)


Tyra had an opportunity to feature models of all ethnicities on ANTM, and enhance how models of all ethnicities ARE used in ad campaigns. Here are some of my favorite ad campaigns that show different ethnicities. Girls have emailed me in the past and messaged me on Facebook about "being ethnic" and how they feel it holds them back. I however, try to give them a perception of how they can use their ethnicity as an "asset" to get ahead.

I wished she mentioned this instead of her weird jungle shoot.

These days in ads, editorials, ad campaigns, and on the runway, we see more than just one ethnicity. We see many. It is not talked about enough. Especially in print ads, not just in fashion editorials, but also in print ads for lifestyle products, and in Glamour and Marie Claire magazine often. LOOK closer and you will see how most of the time it is a white chick, Black, Asian, Spanish, all mixed together to make a beautiful ad campaign for many products out there.

I would like to see Jennifer win America's Next Top Model cycle 13, also because I think she would give a voice to the Asian models, and shorter aspiring models of all ethnicities as well. However ANTM doesn't really do much with the winner actually so I am not sure that unless Jennifer pursued it herself that it would happen. But I think in coming years we will see more than Devon Aoki and Tao Okamoto. They are actually taller than me!

I do well recognize this multiracial model, Juliana Imai, in this Matrix ad, I feel like I've seen her more than once, don't you?:



I hope to see more multiracial models out there.
As for print modeling, a shorter girl of any ethnicity should be pursuing commercial print modeling agencies if they are shorter than 5'7". This is a cool blog on Asian models by the way:
http://asianmodelsblog.blogspot.com/ and for those worried about their ethnicity remember also that Latina Magazine is a great one as well to check out. There is room in this modeling business for all of us!

Friday, October 30, 2009

Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Warrior launch!


YAY! just signed my first in-store copy of my graphic novel "Model Life" in BN in Tribeca! If you like books signed by authors check it out!

"Model Life" should be in your bookstore by now if not very, very soon. I hope you can check it out. The story is based on my modeling adventures and I wrote it for not just aspiring models but girls of all heights. Plus the graphic novel world needs some more girls! right!

Also my illustrator Jazmin Ruotolo is amazing.

You can also meet her at my launch party for Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior (Soft Skull Press), at MercBar on November 12th 2009 from 7-9pm.

Model Life is a celebration of the self-discovery that comes with being self-made and the triumph of beating the odds in modeling, and is based on the real adventures of petite model Isobella Jade.

With a live-photo-shoot involved, this is not going to be your typical book signing. Whatever your height, if you appreciate graphic novels, art, models, fashion, and illustration, it will be a memorable experience.

Model Life is truly a graphic novel for our current Internet/digital age readers and features emails, instant messages, and texts as the main form of communication throughout the work

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

you are in control of the opportunities you get

It is really great to have agents and helpful people on your side, but also during your pursuits I strongly think this world is a self-made world. You have to chase and build your self and goals, you have to get off your booty and make stuff happen. Even on cloudy days. Getting the belief of others, the chance, evolves from giving yourself one.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Modeling poses: The Face




In an article on Glamour.com, I mentioned how I have a gap and an overbite, and how I purposely work to make my smile come together in photos. It comes with practice to know your face, how to pose it, and to know what you look like when you do.
Here are some tips for “knowing your face” when you are infront of the camera.

I am sure you have seen a photo where the model’s face looks uncomfortable and it doesn’t matter how great the rest of her body looks, the facial expression can ruin a shot.

(also a side note: Hands can also ruin a shot. And I will be posting a blog also on posing the hands because an awkward hand can also ruin a shot.)

When in front of the mirror notice not just how your face looks at certain angles, but notice also how it internally “feels”. Not when you touch it, but how it feels internally.
I know what my expression or smile looks like without looking in the mirror because I know the “feeling” of that pose, of what my smile looks like and how I want it to look.

Can you remember how your face feels when you pose?

How does the way your face feel change when you change your expression.

The idea and goal is to know what you look like, without looking in the mirror. To know when in front of the camera, what the camera is seeing.

Knowing what you look like without a mirror can help you produce better photos. At a photo-shoot there isn’t always direction given so bluntly on how to pose your face, and you are expected to ‘give face’ without a mirror to guide you.

Modeling go-see tips for ANTM cycle 13



Isobella shares her graphic novel Model Life, her launch party is in SoHo on November 12th, also you can submit to her shoe modeling casting at petitepride@yahoo.com, and she gives go-see modeling tips.

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

"Model Life" book party casting and ANTM cycle 13 recap





Isobella announces her book party for her fashion illustrated graphic novel "Model Life" on November 12th in SoHo NYC. She is casting 5 petite models for a shoe modeling photo-shoot at her book signing. She also chimes in on ANTM cycle 13 and the girls using their interview skills and how public speaking can actually help your modeling pursuits. Tonight on ANTM the itty-bitty models are challenged to put their interviewing skills to use as they sit in with "90210's" Jessica Lowndes on the set of "The Insider." Isobella also shares a bit about her advertising and marketing background in response to the models writing their own scripts for their CoverGirl commercials this week. Kim Kardashian is this week's guest judge.

Tune in here at 10:30pm after ANTM cycle 13 tonight:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/isobellajade/2009/10/22/Model-Life-book-party-casting-and-ANTM-cycle-13-recap

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Casting 5 petite models in New York City for Model Life book party


Are you petite? Under 5'7"? Are you living in the New York City area? My graphic novel Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior is due this November and on November 12th I am having a launch party! I am casting 5 petite models as the "shoe models of the night" during a live-photo-shoot. Hence my motto that height isn't everything and how shoe modeling was one of my first modeling jobs and in my graphic novel Model Life, the character's first modeling break came with shoe modeling.

I am sorry but for this there is an age requirement, I am looking for is 21+ because it is at a bar/lounge in SoHo.

November 12th 7pm-9pm.

To submit send a photo of yourself to petitepride@yahoo.com

Height isn't everything in modelng ya'know.

Monday, October 19, 2009

"Model Life" book party launch November 12th SoHo





Join model, author Isobella Jade and illustrator Jazmin Ruotolo for the launch party of the fashion illustrated graphic novel:

“Model Life: The Journey of a Pint-Size Fashion Warrior” (Soft Skull Press),

November 12th 2009 from 7pm-9pm.

At MercBar, 151 Mercer Street, in SoHo, NYC.

“Model Life” is a celebration of the self-discovery that comes with being self-made and the triumph of beating the odds in modeling, and is based on the real adventures of petite model Isobella Jade.

With a live-photo-shoot involved, this is not going to be your typical book signing. No matter your height, if you appreciate graphic novels, art, models, fashion, and illustration, it will be a memorable experience.

Isobella is also holding a contest for 5 petite models based in New York City to be a part of the live-photo-shoot at the signing and launch party for “Model Life”, any shorties (girls 5’6” and shorter) can submit by emailing petitepride@yahoo.com, because height isn’t everything in modeling.

“Model Life” was inspired by Isobella’s first book Almost 5’4” which was penned down the street from the MercBar at the Apple Store, not too long ago.

Sunday, October 18, 2009

how models can prepare for go-sees and castings

I posted an article I wrote for BuddyTV, where I give a petite perspective each week and share modeling tips for shorter girls. You might have caught it, but if you didn't here is insight on Model Go-sees 101:

During the Petite Ninja Warriors episode of America's Next Top Model this week, the girls had a go-see challenge. In groups of two, the eight hopefuls were sent to five different castings in a four hour span, in an effort for each of them to live the life of a real model.

This challenge inspired me to share a Go-see 101 with you, since the show didn't go into detail on the real go-see "day in the life." There is more to a go-see than just showing up!

What happens at a go-see: You are sent to "go-see" if you fit for an editorial, ad campaign or commercial, and must present yourself and modeling portfolio to a casting director, art director, editor, or marketing professional in hopes that your look and personality will work with the concept for the modeling job. Sometimes the go-see is more about how you wear or use the product. For example, at jeweler Neil Lane, when Sundai tried on the jewelry she looked more scared than into the idea. Kara, without her ears pierced, immediately blew it, and if she had an agency, the agency would have been a fool to send her to this go-see. Brittany, however, commented on how pretty the jewelry was and showed she was "into" the whole idea.

What to wear: I wear typically jeans, boots or heels, and a tank or t-shirt; however, depending on the go-see, I style my clothing based on the vibe of the brand I am visiting, sometimes even changing in the bathroom before and after if I am between go-sees. I try to dress the part, look like the girl who could model in that ad campaign for that product. Typically a print model is going to go-sees for brands that are not as fashion forward, so you don't have to go into overdrive when it comes to styling yourself. Makeup should be simple, don't over enhance the lips or eyes. No heavy, dark eyes! Hair should be out of face for beauty and skincare go-sees, but use the hair as an asset for a clothing go-see or lifestyle product. Jennifer got told at a go-see she had too much makeup on, Kara came across as a disheveled mess with greasy hair--both go-see no-nos!

How to prepare for a go-see: It is best to know something about the brand, magazine, or client you are about to visit. Is it a cell phone company, cosmetics, or a shoe brand? What is the vibe of the brand? Are they eco-friendly? Is it a high-end product or more commercial? What have their previous campaigns looked like? It is smart for a model to know something about the personality of the brand before the go-see, so that you can better prepare to fit the vibe of the brand. I wish the America's Next Top Model girls were prepared a little better about which brands they were going to visit before their go-see rat-race.

Arranging your portfolio and presentation: If you are going to a casting for a shoe company, then put shots of you modeling shoes at the front of your portfolio and point them out. Also, show up to the casting or go-see looking the part. If it is for shoes, then know ahead of time what type of shoes, heels, sneakers, sandals, or boots, and show up wearing a pair. I am not saying go out and buy a pair of Stewart Weitzman boots for a casting, but show up wearing something of a similar vibe. I've had casting for Nine West shoes and Guess shoes and I try to show up wearing the brand if possible. Whether it is watches, earrings, handbags, skincare, or cosmetics, showing you are relatable to the brand, that you like it and can comment on it in a positive way, can help you book the job sometimes. This also shows you understand the brand, and that you can pull off the concept for the campaign or commercial. Although the job might just entail posing a certain way or walking or wearing a garment beautifully, you still want to show your personality. Erin lacks in the personality department and appears timid, even though the designers at the go-see admired her walk. Laura was told she showed a lot of range in-front of the casting directors and designers, and being able to bring forward your diversity and ability to work with different products is a plus in modeling.

Be prepared for the unexpected: I went to a hand modeling casting for Vaseline, but after the casting director saw on my compcard that I also did full body modeling I was asked to take some back shots. However, I did not have on the underwear I would have preferred. That day I was wearing boyshorts instead of the normal tan or black thong I wear to go-sees and at modeling jobs. I did the shots but didn't felt as prepared. The moral of the story is to expect the unexpected, keep in mind what your compcard shows, and always remember that even if the casting is for one thing--from a hand shot to a shoe--it could involve other aspects. For example: If you go to a casting for shoes, try to make sure your hands also look prepared and polished because for many shoe campaigns the hands are seen putting on the shoe. At ad agency Wongdoody, the mini-models had to read a script with an accent. Luckily some of the girls had one from their hometown or could wing it, but Sundai didn't have one, so she gave the persona of a shy-girl--which wasn't far from the nerves she showed, anyway.

Other tips for model go-sees:


•Know what kind of go-see it is: Most modeling open-calls can be disastrous, and unless you show up early, you should be prepared for a long wait. Also be cautious that it is not a scam, as there are many modeling scams out there with the Internet these days.


•The extra effort for the right opportunity can pay off: For a Macy's commercial go-see I hiked out to Brooklyn, for Victoria's Secret I traveled to Long Island City in Queens, and I booked both jobs. Despite having small hands for the Macy's job, and wearing a size six shoe for the VS job, I showed up with a friendly smile despite the commute, which helped me book the job.


•Have manners and be gracious: It might sound simple, but being gracious and courteous to the product you are modeling does get taken into account. If you try on clothing, jeans, or shoes at a go-see, be kind to them. Hang the dress back up, and put the shoes in a nice row on the floor. Brittany was rightly scorned for placing her shoes on the table during the go-see challenge. Put everything back where you found them, neatly and with respect.

Above all, a go-see is just the model version of an interview. Having confidence, high self-esteem, and the ability to quickly show how well you mesh with the atmosphere and concept of the product or campaign can help you nail the job.

Now go out and put your best foot forward!
Isobella Jade

More of my tips can be found here on BuddyTV:
http://www.buddytv.com/articles/americas-next-top-model/short-model-sensei-go-see-101-31931.aspx

Friday, October 16, 2009

If you live in NYC (books)

If you live in NYC and haven't got a chance to check out my original memoir Almost 5'4", (the book I originally wrote at the Apple Store) I signed 6 in-store copies today at the BNoble stores in Union Square and on 8th Street and 6th ave. :)


Don't let your height hold you down, do the work to get ahead

In my memoir Almost 5'4" I share many of my early modeling mistakes and how I overcame them in hopes you won't make them, also I wrote a lot about the hands-on work I put in to get ahead. The designers I approached, the magazines I submitted to, and how I approached professional photographers with concepts and landed my first tearsheets in magazines on my own.

A lot of girls tell me about the trials of being a model, especially when they are short.

With the Internet becoming such a big part of our daily lives it tends to be the place a girl first goes to learn about modeling and market herself as one. However, the Internet is no place to start a modeling goal, modeling happens when you are modeling "something" -a product-and there are many aspiring brands out there you could contact and approach about modeling for their advertising, especially now when budgets are lower for brand marketing.

Use Google to research brands and small companies, go to tradeshows, craft fairs, boutiques, bring a headshot or compcard. Don't rely on the Internet for you to be discovered, it doesn't happen like that. There is no short-cut, you have to do the work. Try jewelery designers, handbag designers, scarfs, hats, shoes, these are good to consider, especially because there is no height requirement to model a handbag!

These days aspiring brands might need a model but can't afford a high fashion agency model. So that is your cue to get on the ball and market yourself in bigger ways, towards a goal, and with a brand.

With no experience you might not get paid a ton at the start but it is better to get quality experience than waste time counting hits and comments because modeling happens when you "model something". Don't let your height hold you down, and don't settle, aim higher, chase more, want more for your goals.

Also, having some experience, showing the agency you can model, that you have done it before, that you have worked with a brand, aspiring or established, will give you a better chance to be welcomed to work with the agency, despite your height.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

ANTM cycle 13 Petite Ninja Warrior podcast now up!


Here I share insight into preparing, tips and tricks for go-sees and what I liked and didn't about the episode Petite Ninja Warriors on ANTM cycle 13. And model Judge Jessica White speaks up against Nigel's judgements, I think we all should.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/isobellajade/2009/10/15/ANTM-cycle-13-Petite-Ninja-Warriors

Bye-bye perfect

The word perfection is friends with the word model but I think perfection is fading out. The other day I shooting some shoes and it wasn’t about making the shoes look totally perfect, it was about the atmosphere the shoes were in, and telling a story through it. The day in the life of shoe at a rock concert sort of thing. Other times I have been modeling for a food magazine, hand modeling, and there are crumbs on the table, some aggressively ripped chicken, purposely not looking prim and polished for the shot. The scene, setting, the lifestyle of the shot comes alive more than making the product look oh-so-eff’ing perfect. Sand on the leg, wind in the hair, and you will notice in ads and editorials that models have gaps between their teeth, their hair isn't always perfect, pantyhose are running. Or a scar is shown. Perfect isn’t real. It is nice to see ads throwing in there some “real life” because I think that actually sells more than some airbrushed ass or sit-up-straight pose. I love it so much when I do see this, that I want to yell: YES! I love it! each time. I am sick of perfect. My message to advertisers and marketing professionals: Keep that band-aid on the models'/girls' knee, 'cause I am wondering how it got there and noticing the shoes in the ad and will prob buy them.

I might share my own scar stories on my blog soon :)

Thursday, October 8, 2009

ANTM Dance With Me video: movement in modeling

In this video I share how movement in modeling is an asset, based on ANTM Dance With Me episode, knowing your body and proportions and having energy and personality is a benefit for a print model.(Tip: Turn down my podcast radio show on the right side to here better or stop by my model video guides here: www.youtube.com/isobellajade

'America's Next Top Model' goes to the Cirque





The moment I heard that Cirque du Soleill was going to be the theme for this week's episode of "America's Next Top Model," I thought of Ashley. Dance is her forte after all.

Now with Bianca gone, the camera goes to Ashley accordingly. If you want to know who will get cut, most of the time just focus on the theme of the episode and pay attention to who has the weaker leg. Posing with a horse, of course, it was Courtney with her busted foot.


Read more of my recap here on Zap2it:
http://blog.zap2it.com/ithappenedlastnight/2009/10/americas-next-top-model-goes-to-the-cirque.html

A model isn't a model until she has modeled for something

Could be any height, could be plus size, or petite, could be any ethnicity. Models are not just one standard thing these days.

However, a model isn't a model until she has modeled for something. Modeling just your self doesn't make you a model. Being pretty doesn't mean you are a model. A model works with brands and products to sell the image or tell the story of the brand with their look or physical assets. They are all sizes and it is just the media that talks most of fashion, when actually print modeling, which covers a vast diversity of models, is the biggest area of the modeling business and advertising world.

Also, I think the Internet in many ways has dismayed and ruined the word model.

Isobella

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

photo credit on model compcards tips

A girl on Facebook asked me: When making your comp cards do we Put pictures with the photographers name or logo on them ? or just a clean pics?

My thoughts:

Sometimes too much text all over your card can make it look cluttered. You do not have to put photographer credit on each photo. It is not being rude to not put it, simply too many names all over your compcard can look very busy, when the focus of your compcard is suppose to be you. If you want to do it, do it, but don't feel you must. It is a kind gesture to give credit on your compcard of the photographers who took the photos, and if there is a certain photographers name you want to mention on the side of the photo you can, --but you do not have to do it.

Clean pics always look good.

Other compcard tips: Did you know do not have to put 4 photos on the back of your compcard? There is not a rule to follow when it comes to laying out your compcard and how to arrange photos, but just keep this in mind:

1. You don't want to over clutter your compcard with a collage on the back, you want it blunt and simple, shots that show the best of you. Even if it is just 2 photos on the back or one, it is better to show the best of you than just..ok..photos.

2. While you put the card together and think of what photos to use, think about the modeling jobs you want, and target your compcard in that direction, do you want to model for beauty, for skincare, for handbags, jeans, shoes, etc...

3. Your compcard is meant to show a potenical client that will hire you and agency that you CAN model, so be sure to be realistic, especially if you are petite, don't show too many "fashion" styled shots, keep it simple, print modeling is the area for shorter girls to pursue, and include at least one smile shot on the card.

4. Use a professional printing service. Printing through an amatuer website can lead to trouble, and also a professional service will give you the quality that will make you appear more professional to a modeling agency. You want to remember that what you show on your compcard represents the type of model you are and can be. So aim for quality, don't print at home, only go through a professional service. I use www.compcard.com often. More options are also to the right side of this blog.

5. You do not need to have your photo, email, or web links on hte card. Don't do that. Just your name and stats are on your compcard. Here is why: http://petitemodelingtips.blogspot.com/2009/07/making-modeling-comp-card-phone-number.html

:) hope it helps,

-Isobella

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

examples of beauty shots for short models

In a recent Model Talk Radio podcast segment, I mentioned sharing some beauty shots I have taken over the years and some examples. My thoughts on how to create a beauty shot are here on an article on BuddyTV.

When you shoot a beauty shot think of ads and editorials as you shoot, it is also easier to work from a guide, look through cosmetic editorials in magazines and skincare ads,rip out the ones that look like you can pull it off. I am sure you can!

A beauty shot has the essence of a cosmetic, skincare, or ad involving the face. Beauty shots can be straight on, close up, profile, at an angle, from shoulder up or waist up but involve highlighting and enhancing the beauty you naturally have. We are all beautiful, and beauty does not have a certain height or weight, and in modeling it is all about showing what you do have and showing how your assets can be used in print ads and editorials.








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